Fancy a job at Google Dublin?

As posted on the Irish Linux User Group mailing list:Google Logo

Data Center Linux Systems Administrator – EU Headquarters
This is a permanent, full time position based in Dublin
Google is the premier provider of Internet search and has the most advanced
search technology in the world.

We are looking for exceptional System Administrators, at all levels of
experience,
to support our growing server infrastructure.

The ideal candidate will
– work effectively alone, as part of a team or as the technical lead in a
small group of technicians.
– be goal-oriented
– be able to handle interrupts while fluidly switching between several
projects
– take a “work smarter, not harder” approach.
– enjoy looking for opportunities to come up with solutions to difficult
problems.
Responsibilities:
– Configure systems and network devices
– Monitor system stability and performance
– Help develop tools to monitor and maintain systems
– Ensure 24×7 operation
– Proactively scale systems to meet anticipated demand
– Write comprehensive documentation
– Assist in the training of other systems administrators

Requirements:
– BS or MS in Computer Science or equivalent experience
– Multiple years of Linux or UNIX system administration experience
– Working knowledge of TCP/IP networking
– Knowledge of webservers, firewalls/security, DNS, MTAs etc.
– Programming/scripting ability: Python, Bash, Perl, C
– Excellent verbal and written skills with outstanding customer service

For further information please visit http://www.google.com/jobs or email your CV
jobs@google.com. In the subject box you must include the job title: Data
Center Linux Systems Administrator – EU Headquarters.

Java Market Trends

Below is an extract of a report Distributed by Computer People. It’s a breakdown of all the Java Job Adverts for the last 6 months in the London Contract / Permanent Market. While it should be treated with caution as (a) it’s sales and marketing material and (b) the London / UK market will differ substiantially from Dublin. For example , I would not expect to see as many Sybase roles in Dublin as London, due to the use of Sybase in the London Financial markets.

Example from the figures: Of all java jobs advertised in the UK , 36,86% were also looking for J2EE (Enterprise Java) Skills.

  • 22504 (36.86 %) J2EE
  • 17476 (28.62 %) Oracle
  • 16045 (26.28 %) UNIX
  • 15510 (25.40 %) XML
  • 15321 (25.10 %) SQL
  • 15269 (25.01 %) C++
  • 12815 (20.99 %)  Finance
  • 12370 (20.26 %) Banking
  • 11152 (18.27 %) Graduate/Degree/BSc
  • 10069 (16.49 %) OO
  • 9465 (15.50 %) .NET
  • 8413 (13.78 %) CSharp
  • 8188 (13.41 %) JSP
  • 7529 (12.33 %) Sybase
  • 7340 (12.02 %) HTML
  • 6940 (11.37 %) Investment Banking
  • 6740 (11.04 %) UML
  • 6606 (10.82 %) Front Office
  • 6479 (10.61 %) Windows
  • 6343 (10.39 %) SQL Server
  • 5991 (9.81 %) Linux
  • 5533 (9.06 %) Perl
  • 5047 (8.27 %) WebLogic
  • 4940 (8.09 %) JavaScript
  • 4685 (7.67 %) Struts
  • 4547 (7.45 %) EJB2
  • 4456 (7.30 %) Servlets
  • 4435 (7.26 %) Microsoft
  • 4136 (6.77 %) VB
  • 3892 (6.37 %) Fixed Income

Good practices in getting your development project done

A list of good observations on what works with development projects is over at FairlyGoodPractices.com.

No matter what your type of organisation, or the tools that you use (be it Java, .Net or Visual Basic), the key to project sucess is communication, communication, communication.

One of the more unorthodox suggestions are allowing people to change their environment (e.g. move out of their office cubes). It will raise a few eyebrows, but if it works, just do it.

Technical Knowledge Base – Just Launched

Our Technical Knowledge base has just been launched.

We found that over the last 5 years , 80% of the solutions we were building were the same. How many ways are there to take information from the web, apply some business rules or logic to it, and then save it into a database?

Currently the knowledge repository contains information on Enterprise Java , XML , Eclipse, Oracle, Architecture, Project Management as well as a lot of useful links for Dublin, Ireland and Technical specific areas.

The public area to the site can be found here. All information is generic, non-client specific, and can probably already be found on the web, although it is much easier to read it here!

Why IT Projects fail – mastering the monster

The UK based IT Architect site is running a series of articles on why IT Projects fail.

IT Architect Logo

(Part 1) suggests what is obvious (that there are different types of projects), but more usefully classifies them into two types. Type 1 are those that deliver concrete goods (like roads, bridges and office blocks). Type 2 are fuzzier projects aiming to change things, such as a process or organisational culture. It’s much harder to determine success in this second set, as they tend to deliver intangible results (i.e. you can’t drop them on your foot) . They also tend to suffer greater rates of failure. IT projects tend to be Type 2.

Some depressing statistics that if you’re lucky have only read about , or if you’re unlucky, know from personal experience. According to the Standish group, 31% of IT projects are cancelled outright, and over half have such serious performance issues that they were fortunate to escape the same fate. In contrast, a 3% overrun on a construction project is often the trigger for a public enquiry.

While there are many ‘excuses’ given for project failure, the author suggests that often the root cause is over-optimism and ‘biting off more than you can chew’. Symptoms of this over-optimism include projects started without any tolerances set, no change control and without proper reporting structures in place.

The 2nd Part of the article , is a bit more optimisitc, in that starts to tell you what you can do to improve the rates of project success. Broadly speaking , there are two areas suggested for this:

    • Make Type 2 (IT) Projects more like Type 1 (Construction) – remove the fuzziness of success , so that you see the outputs of your project. This often comes down to metrics on the basis of ‘you get what you measure).
      Understand the level of success that you are aiming for. This can range from a simple level 1 (did the project do what was asked of it) , to Level 4 ( did the project have a positive impact on our business strategy). In between are Level 2 (Was this project success a once-off, or do *all* our projects suceed) and Level 3 (our projects may be successful, but are we working on the right ones).
  • For more details , here are links to part 1 and part 2 of the article.
    http://www.itarchitect.co.uk/articles/display.asp?id=203
    http://www.itarchitect.co.uk/articles/display.asp?id=224