Enterprise Java Workshop in Dublin

Link to Enterprise Java Workshop, to be led by Dr. Bruce Martin in Dublin on the 6th – 9th March.

Is anybody going? Is it worth $1995 USD for 4 days? (and I’m not going to get sniffy about us using Euro over here 🙂 ) Who is this course aimed at? In some ways this course is like Corba: very relevant to the very small niche that use these technologies, but the broader line of ‘best practice’ has moved on.

An extract from the Agenda is below. It seem to broadly match what Sun looks for in it’s Enterprise Java Architect Certification. As such it shares the plus and minus of this approach : You get the Orthodox Entreprise Java Approach, or at least the approach being plugged by Sun about 3 years ago.

The trouble with this approach is that the Enterprise Java world has moved on. Hibernate has pushed aside Entity Beans , so much so that Enterprise Java Beans 3.0 is a complete turnaround it it’s direction. Spring has got a lot of traction as an EJB-Lite (and I mean that with the most positive connotations). Enterprise Java Patterns are much better understood (just search the IBM site), if not more widely understood.

Where’s the Ajax and the impact of multiple, small , web requests on application scalability? The JSON (as part of the Web Services)? Does it cover Java Server Faces and the emerging Ajax enabled Java Presentation Frameworks? What about workflow and rule engines and Java Messaging Services (JMS)? How about the tool integration to make your teams life easier when building the designs that you , as an Architect , have come up with? I don’t see Security in there , nor any of the other JSR (Java Specification Requests) that have come out of the broader Java community in the last 3 years.

And that’s before I go on about the only ‘technology alternative’ being offered is .Net – the PHP , Ruby and Oracle guys will have something to say about that! All have strong cases to make on a project by project basis. What about off the shelf products (both open source and commercial) that could , depending on the project, give you most of the functionality you need and you just have to customise the remaining 20%?

Maybe I’m being unfair, and the above is not the aim of the course.

For info, it’s on in the Gresham hotel on Dublin’s O’Connell Street from the 6th to the 9th of March. If you want a good solid foundation in Enterprise Java, and if somebody else is paying for it then it’s probably to be recommended. It might even help you get certified as a ‘Sun Enterprise Java Architect’. But unless you’re in an outstanding group, don’t expect it to be cutting edge.

Are you going – prove me wrong and leave a comment!

Project Module

  • Introduction
  • The Value Propositions of J2EE and EJB
  • J2EE vs..NET
  • Requirements of the Auction Application
  • Group Discusssion: J2EE or not, EJB or not
  • Activity: Identify the Auction Objects
  • Vertical Slices
  • Activity: Identify Vertical Slice
  • Communicating Architectures

Persistence Module

  • Pros and cons of JDBC
  • Object Relational Mapping
  • Java Data Objects (JDO)
  • EJB 2.x CMP Model and Relationships
  • EJB 3
  • Other O-R mapping solutions
  • Group Discussion: Persistence Matrix
  • Activity: Persistence Strategy for the
    Auction
  • Advanced Transaction and Concurrency
    Control topics
  • Activity: Identify the Transactions

Scalability Module

  • Principles of Scalability and Fault
    Tolerance
  • Application Server Clustering solutions
  • Activity: Scaling the Auction

Integration Module

  • Messaging
  • Activity: Messaging in the Auction
  • Connectors
  • XML, Web Services and SOA
  • Activity: Enterprise Application
    Integration
  • Activity: B2B Integration

Application Design Module

  • Top Ten J2EE Design Patterns
  • Activity: Design patterns or not
  • Activity: Complete the design
  • Group Discussion: Custom Consulting

Eclipse Callisto – 10 for the price of 1

I have a colleague who is as much an advocate of the IntelliJ IDE for Java, as I am for Eclipse. So far, in the ‘My Java Tool is better than yours’ game, I can claim the low cost (free), the number of plugins (huge) and number of developers using it (no figures, but I suspect Eclipse is now the development platform of choice). His trump card for Intellij is that ‘you download it and it just works’ – no messing around with installing plugins for stuff like JSP and Enterprise Java editing.

While plugins are always going to be slightly messy (you don’t get the gain of extensibility without some pain in the form of configuration), the Eclipse Callisto release , due in July, is another step in the right direction. It is a simultaneous release of 10 major Eclipse projects, including BIRT (reporting tools), Data Tools, Eclipse Web Tools, the Visual Editor , Test and Performance Tools and the Graphical Modelling Framework.

It may not be a ‘download from one place and it just works’, but by removing any integration issues, it will make your life easier.

Technical Knowledge Base – Just Launched

Our Technical Knowledge base has just been launched.

We found that over the last 5 years , 80% of the solutions we were building were the same. How many ways are there to take information from the web, apply some business rules or logic to it, and then save it into a database?

Currently the knowledge repository contains information on Enterprise Java , XML , Eclipse, Oracle, Architecture, Project Management as well as a lot of useful links for Dublin, Ireland and Technical specific areas.

The public area to the site can be found here. All information is generic, non-client specific, and can probably already be found on the web, although it is much easier to read it here!

I have seen the future of web applications and it is ….

Jotspot . It’s not that it is very much a Web 2.0 company. It’s more that it draws together a lot of previous ideas into one easy to use package.

  • It’s easy to use – if you can use Microsoft Office , you can use JotSpot
  • It’s easy to develop – ‘Power Users’ not developers can do it (the sort that come up with fancy Excel Spreadsheets).
  • It’s web based, is available everywhere and uses a very fluid Ajax interface
  • It can be easily extended , so all the people currently playing around with PHP and websites can get up and running more quickly.
  • It’s free, with a more powerful commercial version

Other ‘out of the box’ features include being able to import Excel Spreadsheets and have them available as online applications. It also comes with ready build applications such as CRM , Project Management Tools, Colloboration Tools etc

Jotspot is exactly the sort of ‘Component based Architcture’ that Java Developers have been aiming towards. It ties the portability of Java, the ease of development of Visual Basic and the promise of Lotus Notes. It also has a full set of easy to use XML API’s , so a wave a client applications tied into a Jotspot server is not far off.

PHP, MySql and Mambo

Been (re)finding the joys of PHP , MySql and Mambo CMS lately , to update my consulting website firstpartners.net.

Normally , I’m a Java / Oracle / XML person myself , but due to a happy accident , the hosting company I use prefers PHP et al. While I’m not about to give up the J2EE , am definately convinced that for websites less that 10 pages , PHP / MySql is the way to go.

Anybody who’s interested in consultants in Dublin / Drogheda / Dundalk / Newry / Belfast (all parts of Southern / Northern Ireland) , feel free to stop by. Those people who are into Mambo will notice the highly modified framework , sometimes out of my ignorance of the available components….